Flower Nomenclature ~ Montessori Printables

We have a new addition in our Montessori Printables collection!

Flower Nomenclature Printables

Our new FLOWER set is ready.  This set contains 30 different flowers! I am not a flower expert so if I got one wrong or misspelled, please let me know!  Here’s a peek at the cards…

Flower Nomenclature  Flower Nomenclature

  

Unfamiliar with Nomenclature cards, also called 3-Part cards? 

Nomenclature cards are a Montessori based idea. The word Nomenclature comes from the Latin “nomenclatura” which means assigning of names to things. Nomenclature cards are also called “3 part cards” for obvious reasons!

Here’s a couple of articles sharing more about the what, why, and how!

Download your FREE Flowers Nomenclature Cards here!

Flower Nomenclature Printables Montessori

The sets available are listed in alphabetical order, look for the words “Flowers” and click!


See more Montessori ideas on our Pinterest board!

Follow {1plus1plus1} Carisa’s board Montessori on Pinterest.


Looking for more Flower and Plant fun?

Garden and Plants Theme Collection Flower Books Botany Theme Calendar Connections

Follow {1plus1plus1} Carisa’s board Garden Theme on Pinterest.



Backyard Birds Montessori Printables ~ Nomenclature

We have a new addition in our Montessori Printables collection!

Backyard Birds Nomenclature Printables

Our new Backyard Birds set is ready.  This set contains all of the birds featured in our Backyard Birds Calendar Connections set, plus 5 additional birds for a total of 36 different birds!

Slide13   Slide14

Unfamiliar with Nomenclature cards, also called 3-Part cards? 

Nomenclature cards are a Montessori based idea. The word Nomenclature comes from the Latin “nomenclatura” which means assigning of names to things. Nomenclature cards are also called “3 part cards” for obvious reasons!

Here’s a couple of articles sharing more about the what, why, and how!

Backyard Birds Montessori Printables

Download your FREE Backyard Birds Nomenclature Cards here!

The sets available are listed in alphabetical order, look for the words “Backyard Birds” and click!


See more Montessori ideas on our Pinterest board!

Follow {1plus1plus1} Carisa’s board Montessori on Pinterest.


Looking for more BIRD fun?

All About Birds Calendar Connections Printables  Backyard Birds eBook  North American Backyard Birds Calendar Connections for K-2nd Grade

Counting is for the Birds Kindergarten Literature unit  Birds Printable Pack

Follow {1plus1plus1} Carisa’s board Bird Theme on Pinterest.



Crawly Creatures Memory and Match-Up Printables

I have a new set of Montessori Printables for you!  A few weeks ago we shared our Crawly Creatures 3-Part Cards and today we have a Memory/Match-Up set.

Crawly Creatures Memory and Match Up Printables

There are 3 different pages included in this set, shown below.  The top two are the same, except one has the word and one doesn’t.  When we play memory, we use one of each.

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Below you see the “Match-Up” board, which we only used when Ladybug was a tot.  This page is meant to be left whole and used for matching as shown in examples later in this post.Slide7

Ideas for using these printables…

This is how we used the Match-Up option when Ladybug was a tot.  I left the board whole as shown and then printed a set of cards for her to match to the board.  This helps with word-picture association and visual discrimination skills. The set below went along with our J is for Jellyfish/Ocean Animals theme.

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Each unit in Tot School Printables had a vocabulary sheet like this {the picture cards} and she loved them as a tot.  She loved drawing ad coloring on them as I called out a word.  The page shown below is from our J is for Jellyfish/Ocean Animals set.

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I often slipped them in our dry erase center.  Below you can see her pretending to write the letters in each word. The page below is from our V is for Volcano/Landforms set.

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Often is was just scribbling! The page below is from our U is for Umbrella/Weather theme.

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Matching mini animals is something we did a lot, when we had animals to go along.  Below is the C is for Cat/Pets printable with the Pets Toob animals.

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Below she is matching up small mammals from our M is for Mouse/Small Mammals set.

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Below you can see our D is for Duck/Birds printables being used with some bird stuffed animals we have.

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Below is the G is for Goat/Farm set with some Little People Farm animals we have.

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Below she is using homemade pom pom magnets and a cookie sheet and putting her magnet on the word I call out. The printable below is from R is for Rainforest.

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The final and most obvious way to use these printables is to play memory!  Print 2 sets of the picture cards, laminate, and play memory!

Memory

 

Download your FREE Crawly Creatures Memory & Match-Up here!

The sets available are listed in alphabetical order, look for the words “Crawly Creatures” under the “Memory and Match-Up” category and click!

While there, you’ll also find our Crawly Creatures Nomenclature printables too, these are under the “Nomenclature/3-Part Cards” category.

Montessori-Nomenclature-Printables


See more Montessori ideas on our Pinterest board!

Follow {1plus1plus1} Carisa’s board Montessori on Pinterest.


Looking for more BUG fun?

Bugs-Coloring-Printables4   Bug-Theme-Collection3

Bugs-Pinterest-Board4



Crawly Creatures Montessori Printables

Montessori Nomenclature Printables 3 Part Cards Bugs and Creatures

I have been meaning to add to our Montessori Printables collection for years and was finally inspired to finish some sets I had begun long ago! I have a few more sets I am working on and hope to continue sharing these as I complete them. 

For today, here is our new Crawly Creatures set.  It began as just bugs, but I wanted to include a snail, slug, and worm so I had to change the name!

Montessori 3 Part Cards Bugs Montessori 3 Part Cards Bugs

Unfamiliar with Nomenclature cards, also called 3-Part cards? 

Nomenclature cards are a Montessori based idea. The word Nomenclature comes from the Latin “nomenclatura” which means assigning of names to things. Nomenclature cards are also called “3 part cards” for obvious reasons!

Here’s a couple of articles sharing more about the what, why,  and how!

Download your FREE Crawly Creatures Nomenclature Cards here!

The sets available are listed in alphabetical order, look for the words “Crawly Creatures” and click!


See more Montessori ideas on our Pinterest board!

Follow {1plus1plus1} Carisa’s board Montessori on Pinterest.


Looking for more BUG fun?

Bugs Coloring Printables   Bug Theme Collection

Bugs Pinterest Board



Montessori Minute ~ Bare Essentials

{disclosure: this post contains affiliate links}Montessori Minute Bare Essentials

This is a guest post written by John Bowman, author of Montessori at Home!

 

Montessori Bare EssentialsIf you have a Bachelor’s degree, a year off, and $ to spare, you can take a Montessori teacher training course and learn everything you want to about Montessori. The sheer quantity of books, papers, and other work Montessori created during a lifetime dedicated to children is incredible. It takes awhile to wade through, much less grasp thoroughly.

Photo: Toddler Approved!

There is a ‘secret’ about Montessori, though, that programs charging big bucks to train teachers don’t talk about much. Since I’m a huge advocate for parents, however, I’m happy to tell you:

Doing Montessori with preschoolers is simple

Montessori did all the heavy lifting of creating a completely new way of looking at young children that changed everything all over the world. Then, she created the first Prepared Environment. Like many jewel-like things of beauty, this practical application of her work is wonderfully simple. Don’t think so? Let me explain every Montessori preschool in 9 sentences:

A clean, bright, attractive area is furnished with sets of low shelves and child sized tables and chairs. There are flowers and works of art, and everything is aesthetically pleasing and organized. On the shelves are a huge variety of interesting, self-contained materials for the children to use. They move freely, making their own choices about what they want to work with and whether to work alone or with other children. The children set out rugs and mats to create work areas, and then bring materials to their work areas to use. When finished, they put the material back in the same spot on the shelf where they found it. The children follow a few simple rules that encourage them to respect each other and share the space and materials constructively. A teacher wanders among them, demonstrating materials, guiding children as needed, and working with children individually or in small groups. The atmosphere is busy, rich in opportunities for all kinds of fun work, and the children largely manage themselves.

It’s like free play on steroids. Free play in traditional preschools, like many things we do with preschoolers (except digital learning), had its origins in the Montessori Prepared environment. The big ‘secret’ about Montessori is that her work fills volumes, but the practical application of all her work – the Prepared Environment – is easy to understand. All those materials on the shelves are easy to understand as well. They are for preschoolers, after all!  There are a lot of them in all the different areas because Montessori followed a simple rule:

The environment must be rich in motives which lend interest to activity and invite the child to conduct his own experiences.”

She summed up her approach this way:

“An interesting piece of work, freely chosen, which has the virtue of inducing concentration rather than fatigue, adds to the child’s energies and mental capacities, and leads him to mastery.”

Montessori Bare Essentials 2Rather than have adults decide what the children should do every day (lesson plans), Montessori put out it all out there at once in the form of self-contained materials the children could choose from and use on their own whenever they liked, following a few simple rules that taught them to exercise their freedom with responsibility to others.

Photo: Flower arranging at Discovery Moments

Montessori trusted life to unfold in an intelligent, optimal way if given the chance. She followed children as they grew according to nature, rather than trying to control the process as most forms of education do. Montessori let children follow their universal inner passions to absorb, learn, grow, and know. The result? Children who by the age of six read and do math at what public school calls a second to fourth grade level, without pressure or stress, in an environment filled with joy and discovery. These children also develop excellent brain architecture, a positive and confident self-image, and a true love of learning. Not bad! Parents can do many of the same activities found in Montessori schools right at home. You can make most of your materials yourself and buy others. Here are a few core points to remember to help guide your home Montessori adventures:

Encouraging spontaneous concentration and focused attention is the heart of Montessori. The materials are vehicles for this. Concentration creates self-disciplined children who are calmer, happier, and more satisfied with life; and who can learn anything more easily.

Start with Practical Life and Sensorial materials. Work in Science, Math and Reading as your child shows interest.

Try a wide variety of materials. Observe to see what materials your child spontaneously focuses her attention and concentration on, and wants to repeat over a period of time.

Keep these materials out on low shelves for your child to use when he likes. When a material no longer attracts his interest, take a picture of it and put those in a little box on the shelf. Switch the material out for one he is into concentrating on now. The pictures help your child remember each activity in case she wants to repeat them.

Not so complicated. It really is quite fun when you get into it. Parents are very capable of creating excellent Montessori style experiences at home. Montessori just makes sense. Montessori materials free the adult from having to be the center of attention and the source of all knowledge. Children ‘auto-educate’ with Montessori materials simply by using them.

 

Montessori bare Essentials 3Like a Montessori teacher, your job becomes helping maintain your child’s materials in a nice condition, suggesting and making new materials, and demonstrating or working with your child as needed. Your child’s work will increasingly be independent. You can focus more on reading together, playing outside, doing art projects, and just having fun. Photo: Touch Basket, Montessori At Home!

Montessori bare Essentials 4Start small, with one or two materials a week. The Quick Start Guide in Montessori At Home! shows you how to get started the same day you download the eBook. As you and your child become comfortable, add more materials that your child shows interest in. Let him look through the eBook with you to find them, and help shop for supplies to put materials together.

Photo: Color sorting at Family Go Simple

With a small investment of about half what you would otherwise spend on disposable plastic toys over 2-3 years, your time, and your love, your child can have many of the same benefits of a Montessori school.

© 2013 John Bowman

The new Third Edition of Montessori At Home! was released in March 2013. It has 512 pages of guidance, how-to information, descriptions of over 300 early learning materials and activities, recommendations for over 225 digital tablet apps for preschoolers, 76 pages of free printables, and a copy of the eBook, Mom Bloggers Talk Montessori. $10.95 at Montessori At Home!,


My thanks to John for writing this extensive article for us here at 1+1+1=1! I invite you to ask him any questions you may have in the comments below and he can hopefully answer them for you. If you have an article you hope he will write for us in the future, please let us know in the comments also! Be sure to let him know if this article was helpful-we all love encouragement, right?

Did you miss earlier Montessori Minute Posts?